Three Things Necessary to Pass the NREMT

Wouldn’t it be nice if there was a magical formula to guarantee a passing result on the NREMT?

Sadly, there isn’t. But we do have some ideas of what the components might be. There are a few different types of students we deal with at Limmer Creative. As we begin to talk about this formula, consider these three recent students:

 

  1.  The student who scores near the top of his or her EMT class, but fails the NREMT twice. This student probably has the knowledge necessary to pass, but feels they “choke” when they get to the exam.
  2. The student who fails the NREMT, but gets above/below passing in different sections each time they take the exam. This ping pong approach with varied results leaves the student wondering what to study each time.
  3. The student who fails the NREMT 3 or 4 times and then passes when the odds say he or she won’t. This student claims to have studied each time. What has he or she done differently that allowed them to pass this time?

The advice most people give to these students is simply, “Study more.” We believe the problem goes deeper than that. In a recent phone call with a student who had failed the NREMT twice, Dan explained the three core things he thought the student needed. These were:

  1. Knowledge – There must be a fundamental knowledge of the material at the level the student is testing.
  2. The ability to read and interpret a NREMT style question – Most in-class exam questions don’t prepare a student well enough to handle what the NREMT throws at them.
  3. Mojo – You have to believe you can pass to actually pass.

While knowledge is the obvious need, the other two are highly underrated—especially in the person who has tried the NREMT multiple times unsuccessfully. The percentage of each of the three things varies from person to person but we believe all three must be addressed to bring a student to pass the NREMT—especially after multiple attempts.

Our EMTReview.com website is designed to address each of these critical needs.

This whole post came about when we heard Dan talk to a student this week. Probably the most significant thing we heard was the student’s voice transition from hopeless to having hope in his chances of passing the NREMT.

And that is exactly the reason we are here.